';
side-area-logo
TECHNOLOGY

> 100
FASTER SPEED

Cambridge GaN Devices Gallium Nitride transistors can switch high voltages and currents over 100 times faster than the best-selling commercial silicon MOSFET guarantying reliable operation compared to the existing GaN solutions. As GaN transistors begin to replace silicon in everything from consumer electronics chargers, data servers, and solar panel inverters. This technology will help transform the future.

5-10X
LESS POWER LOSS

Cambridge GaN Devices Gallium Nitride transistors, take advantage of the tremendous proprieties of GaN such as the material’s higher critical electrical field, the extremely high electron-mobility, and low on-state resistance to deliver efficient power transitors which are less hot and therefore require significantly smaller cooling requirement.

3X
SMALLER

Cambridge GaN Devices Gallium Nitride transistors are not only physically smaller but can also operate at higher power densities and higher frequency than silicon equivalents. Smaller chips united with smaller passive components and reduced cooling requirement enables light and compact building blocs for the final application.

Cambridge GaN Devices (CGD) bring to customers Gallium Nitride (GaN) transistors with significantly higher switching frequency, lower losses and lower on-resistance than the most commercially successful silicon alternatives. Using GaN as the main semiconductor and growing this on a silicon substrate, combined with a suite of proprietary technical innovations, provides CGD with a number of competitive advantages:

• CGD GaN transistors are extremely reliable even at the highest frequencies

• CGD GaN technology enables both smaller transistors and associated circuitry

• High efficiency operation and reduced cooling requirements significantly reduce the Bill of Materials

• CGD GaN transistors have been designed with the end-user in mind and can readily displace silicon
alternatives with little or no technical training

• With silicon as the substrate, CGD GaN transistors can benefit from low-cost manufacturing processes.